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Promoted by Lee Anderson on behalf of Ben Bradley both of 4 Jade Court, Mansfield, NG18 4WJ.

May Written Questions

May 31, 2019

Question asked on 01/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of electric vehicle charging points in Nottinghamshire.

 

Nottingham City Council has been awarded £6m under the Government’s Go Ultra Low Cities Scheme to deliver a range of initiatives in Nottingham and Derby to increase the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles, including deploying 35 rapid and 195 fast charging units at key locations across the cities. The Council has also been awarded £700k under the Ultra-low Emission Taxi Infrastructure Scheme, to deliver 20 rapid chargepoints and 12 fast chargepoints dedicated to taxis and private hire vehicles.

 

The Government has various UK-wide support schemes in place to assist with the cost of installing chargepoints in motorists’ homes, on residential streets, in workplaces, car parks and the wider public estate. The workplace scheme has provided funding for 59 chargepoints in the wider Nottingham area.

 

Question asked on 02/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to improve careers advice for young adults with learning difficulties and disabilities.

 

The careers strategy, published in December 2017, includes proposals to improve the quality and coverage of careers advice in schools. For example, the Careers & Enterprise Company and the Gatsby Foundation have developed a toolkit containing tips for schools and employers to help them support young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). This is available at the following link: http://www.talentinocareers.co.uk/send-gatsby-benchmark-toolkit.pdf.

 

The Careers & Enterprise Company has awarded £1.7 million to 20 organisations to support some of the most vulnerable young people to help them prepare for the world of work. This is targeted at programmes supporting disadvantaged groups including those with SEND), looked after children and care leavers and young people from gypsy, Roma and traveller communities. Projects include tailored careers support in Sussex for young people with SEND and their parents and a partnership that helps young people with autism to engage with local employers and learn about the technical routes available to them in Leeds.

 

The National Careers Service provides free, up to date, impartial information, advice and guidance on careers, skills and the labour market in England. It offers face-to-face advice, a helpline with web chat, text and telephone support and a website which gives customers 24-hour access to information and advice. All services are available to adults aged 19+ and young people aged 13 to 18 can use the website and helpline. People with learning difficulties and disabilities are a priority group for face-to-face advice and the National Careers Service are very experienced in providing support to vulnerable groups. Just over a fifth (22%) of National Careers Service face-to-face customers have a disability, which is higher than in the general population (18%).[1]

 

[1] Summer 2017 equality analysis of the National Careers Service.

 

Question asked on 08/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help raise awareness of Huntington's disease.

 

Huntington’s disease is a rare inherited progressive disorder that causes motor, cognitive, and psychiatric signs and symptoms.

 

The United Kingdom Rare Disease Strategy, published in 2013, is a high-level framework committed to raising awareness about all rare diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, and sets out a strategic vision for improving the lives of all those affected.

 

Steps to increase awareness of rare conditions are being taken through the implementation of the Strategy. The Department published an update to its implementation plan to achieve the commitments in the Strategy in England on 27 February 2019.

 

Question asked on 09/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with representatives of universities on the sharing of applicants’ pupil premium status and ethnicity directly with universities in order to enabling progress on access and participation.

 

Widening access and participation in higher education is a priority for the government. This means that everyone with the capability to succeed in higher education should have the opportunity to participate, regardless of their background or where they grew up.

 

We have made real progress in ensuring universities are open to all, with record rates of disadvantaged 18-year-olds in higher education. However, we know there is further to go to maximise the potential of the talent out there, so it is vital that we build on this progress.

 

Higher education providers need to use good quality and meaningful data to identify disadvantage in order to effectively address disparities in access and participation in higher education. We encourage institutions to use a range of measures to identify disadvantage, including individual-level indicators, area data (such as Participation of Local Areas, Index of Multiple Deprivation or postcode classification from ACORN), school data, intersectional data such as Universities and Colleges Admissions Service’s (UCAS) Multiple Equality Measure, and participation in outreach activities. To this end, we are working with the Office for Students (OfS), UCAS and sector representatives to further explore how we can support universities to improve and enhance access to data.

 

We want institutions to consider a broad range of information in their offers, including the context in which a student’s results were achieved. We are committed to helping universities progress in their efforts to improve access and successful participation for under-represented groups.

 

Question asked on 09/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Office for Students on the transmission of data on applicants’ pupil premium status and ethnicity directly to universities in order to support universities’ work on widening participation and access.

 

Widening access and participation in higher education is a priority for the government. This means that everyone with the capability to succeed in higher education should have the opportunity to participate, regardless of their background or where they grew up.

 

We have made real progress in ensuring universities are open to all, with record rates of disadvantaged 18-year-olds in higher education. However, we know there is further to go to maximise the potential of the talent out there, so it is vital that we build on this progress.

 

Higher education providers need to use good quality and meaningful data to identify disadvantage in order to effectively address disparities in access and participation in higher education. We encourage institutions to use a range of measures to identify disadvantage, including individual-level indicators, area data (such as Participation of Local Areas, Index of Multiple Deprivation or postcode classification from ACORN), school data, intersectional data such as Universities and Colleges Admissions Service’s (UCAS) Multiple Equality Measure, and participation in outreach activities. To this end, we are working with the Office for Students (OfS), UCAS and sector representatives to further explore how we can support universities to improve and enhance access to data.

 

We want institutions to consider a broad range of information in their offers, including the context in which a student’s results were achieved. We are committed to helping universities progress in their efforts to improve access and successful participation for under-represented groups.

 

Question asked on 10/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if her Department will publish the recent advice given by the Deputy Chief Medical Officer on the definition of a terminal illness for the purpose of claiming benefits; and if she will make a statement.

 

The previous Deputy Chief Medical Officer carried out an informal meeting with a selection of specialist clinicians to discuss their views on the current Special Rules for Terminal Illness process. Being an informal meeting no formal report was produced.

 

Question asked on 13/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department has taken in response to its consultation on preserving the free use of public parks.

 

On 14 December 2018 the Government published its response to the consultation stating that we would not impose regulations on local authorities preventing them from charging for free to use events held in public parks. However, we remain committed to the underlying principle that the use of public parks by the public for reasonable everyday use is, and should remain, free.

 

The Government is currently working together with the Local Government Association to identify models of good practice and collaborative working between local authorities and local groups that can be shared widely to make the best use of parks for the whole community.

 

Question asked on 16/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the funding per pupil at (a) primary and ( b) secondary schools in Nottinghamshire in 2019-20.

 

Answer - Nottinghamshire will receive, in total, £482.1 million through the schools block of the Dedicated Schools Grant in 2019-20, as calculated under the national funding formula. This means that the overall average per pupil funding for mainstream schools in Nottinghamshire this year is £4,442.

 

Local authorities are still responsible for designing a local formula to fund schools in their areas. The average per pupil funding allocated under Nottinghamshire’s local formula is £3,990 per pupil in primary schools, and £5,017 per pupil in secondary schools.

 

Schools also receive funding from separate funding streams and additional grants, such as the high needs blocks of the DSG and the Pupil Premium.

 

Question asked on 16/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many homes are planned to be built on public land in the East Midlands under the Public Land for Housing Programme 2015-20 by 2020.

 

Answer - As of March 2018, there are around 1,800 homes planned to be built in the East Midlands which have been released under the Public Land for Housing Programme 2015-20. Departments are looking to dispose of land in all regions of England by March 2020.

 

Question asked on 20/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners were released from HMP Nottingham into homelessness in each month since June 2017.

 

Data from October 2017 until March 2018, based on published statistics, are provided on the attached table (tabled can be viewed here). Please note that data for April 2018 onwards is due for publication in July. Figures for January to September 2017 are not included as this would require assuring unpublished statistics which could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

 

It is vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe, stable and secure to live. Having somewhere stable to live acts as a platform for ex-offenders to be able to access the services and support needed to turn their back on crime for good. Overcoming the many barriers offenders face to securing suitable accommodation is something that Ministry of Justice cannot do in isolation.

The Secretary of State for Justice and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government are both members of the cross-Government Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Taskforce and the Reducing Reoffending Board. Homelessness of ex-offenders is a key issue that is discussed at these meetings.

 

We are investing up to £6.4m in a joint pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons, namely Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville. We have now launched our Invitation to Tender, to secure suppliers in the three pilot areas. This is a concrete step in our commitment to tackling rough sleeping.

 

Question asked on 20/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to reduce youth-related violence in (a) Mansfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire.

 

Answer pending.

 

Question asked on 21/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of pupils achieved a NVQ3+ or equivalent in Nottinghamshire in 2018.

 

Answer - Level 3 attainment by young people aged 19 in 2018 was published in April 2019 in the following national statistics release: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/level-2-and-3-attainment-by-young-people-aged-19-in-2018.

 

The table below gives the proportion of pupils aged 19 in 2018 who had achieved a level 3 qualification. Proportions are for those educated in the state sector at age 15.

 

Cohort of pupils aged 19 in 2018                Pupils attaining level 3 by age 19
 

Nottinghamshire local authority                       51.8%
 

East Midlands                                                  52.4%
 

England                                                           57.2%

 

Level 3 includes A levels (including Applied A levels, Vocational A levels and Pre-U principal subjects), International Baccalaureate, AS levels, Advanced Apprenticeships, National Vocational Qualifications and Vocationally Related Qualifications and other qualifications, including the level 3 diploma.

 

Question asked on 21/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport how much funding from the public purse was allocated to support tourism in the East Midlands in 2016-17.

 

Answer - In 2016 there were 363,064 international visits to Nottinghamshire, up 29% on the previous year. These visitors spent £128 million in Nottinghamshire, up 23% on the previous year.

 

VisitBritain and VisitEngland are responsible for promoting the UK as a tourist destination, through a range of different initiatives and campaigns. VisitBritain receive annual grant-in-aid totalling £19.4m from DCMS and VisitEngland receive £7m.

 

The Discover England Fund, administered by VisitEngland, has invested in the development of tourism product across the East Midlands area. Projects such as The Explorer’s Road, the US Connections project and the England’s Literary Greats have all received funding.

 

Information from the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government indicate that Local Authorities spent £5.2m on tourism in 2016-17.

 

Question asked on 21/05/2019 - To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support the mental health of people who have diabetes.

 

Answer pending.

 

 

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